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What’s New

Today in Baltimore, there’s a celebration for the 200th birthday of our National Anthem.

We want to do our part, so Colonial Williamsburg’s Fifes and Drums are honoring the occasion with their own rendition of The Star Spangled Banner, recorded at a 2006 performance.

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Retired US Marine Corps General Anthony Zinni rose from simple roots to one of the highest positions in military leadership, and he didn’t miss a thing along the way. His new book, “Before the First Shots are Fired, How America Can Win or Lose off the Battlefield” is an incisive critique of armed engagements past …

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By Sue Robinson

Lace is making fashion news this fall. DKNY, the doyenne of New York urban chic for the Manhattan working woman, is showing lace dresses. It’s an edgy look: Donna Karan is presenting lace sheath dresses, in pink and black, with clunky leather boots.

Also seen on runways: Lacy or crocheted tops with jeans and …

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Costumes were first worn by Colonial Williamsburg hostesses at the Raleigh Tavern during President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s visit for the dedication of Duke of Gloucester Street on Oct. 20, 1934. The first costumes were so successful that by Nov. 5, 1934, costumes were ordered for all hostesses in Colonial Williamsburg exhibition buildings. Early hostess gowns …

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By Sue Robinson

When it comes to carrying stuff, today’s women have all sorts of choices.

Slip an ID and a debit card in the back pocket of a pair of jeans. Lug a shoulder bag, a laptop messenger bag and a designer lunch bag from parking deck to office. Some women jog, sightsee and shop wearing …

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By Sue Robinson

The lowly apron, in modern times, is usually a utilitarian garment. It says: Let’s get to work.

Flo wears one. In our locavore, craft beer, restaurant-hopping culture , we see the apron on the farmer’s market vendor, the brewer, the chef or waitress.

Yet even today, aprons can be fancy and fussy: Run a …

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