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What’s New

It is at this time of year that the gardener is supplied with a surfeit of simlins.  This is the variety of summer squash most favored by Virginia planters.

Striped simlins

In 1597, John Gerard called it a “buckler” because it was shaped “in a manner flat like unto a shield or buckler.”  The buckler …

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Second session field school stdents at the Bray School site.

Three weeks ago, working late into the afternoon with the threat of a late summer thunderstorm ready to break at any moment, the Colonial Williamsburg / College of William and Mary field school in Historical Archaeology wrapped up its third season of excavation at the …

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Williamsburg is a town with a legacy of producing patriotic fervor. From the Revolutionary War to the Civil War, her streets have been paced by young men brimming with passion for the country they dream of creating.

One such young man marched under the mantle of a singular moniker: Decimus et Ultimus Barziza. Born with …

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By Ben Swenson

The summer’s winding down, but there’s still time for kid stuff. Here are five ideas that will let you and your children steal some fun in the Revolutionary City before school starts.

The Benjamin Powell House and the James Geddy House

The Revolutionary City is full of sights to behold: a mob of citizens gathering …

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The Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg will expand and enhance educational programming,  thanks to a major endowment, according to Colonial Williamsburg Foundation President and CEO Colin G. Campbell.

The gift by Susan and David Goode of Norfolk, Va., will support efforts including tours, teacher workshops and regular classes offered at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum’s …

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Dr. W. A. R. Goodwin once called the Moody House “one of the most charming Colonial houses in Williamsburg.” Blacksmith Josiah Moody occupied the house which bears his name from 1794 until his death in 1810. The Moody House was demolished and rebuilt in 1939-40 as guest accommodations, using most of the original …

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