History.org: The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation's Official History and Citizenship Website

What’s New

“It is wonderful how much may be done, if we are always doing.”
– Thomas Jefferson, 1787

With so many intriguing research projects, new family programs and behind-the-scenes stories taking place across Colonial Williamsburg every day – we’ve decided to make an exciting change! That’s right. We’re combining talent and resources across the Foundation to … Continue Reading »

Colonial Williamsburg turns its visitors into its spies for the fifth year in a row with RevQuest: The King’s Advance. Take your place in the Revolution with this online/onsite game that tasks its players with unraveling a true Revolutionary mystery. Meet with secret agents, crack codes, and transmit vital information to the guardians of … Continue Reading »

By John Watson

Each hole on the toe boards will have a pipe perched on it.

A toe board looks like a solid board with slightly funnel-shaped holes for the pipes (see wind-chest diagram), but the boards are anything but solid. Inside the toe board are many hidden channels running … Continue Reading »

Last week I had the great pleasure of accompanying a group of enthusiasts who study the genus Rhododendron.

View from Round Bald

On one of our treks we explored the balds of Roan Mountain that rise above 5,000 feet on the border of Tennessee and North Carolina and support a great population of Flame Azaleas … Continue Reading »

By Ben Swenson

The recruits of the Colonial Williamsburg Fifes and Drums have come to the Revolutionary City from many different backgrounds. Some always knew they’d join this ensemble. Others seemed to have stumbled on it accidentally.

All of them have signed on to a life-changing journey.

In these audio clips, the recruits tell the stories of what … Continue Reading »

By Ben Swenson

Entrepreneurs love to see business coming through the door. But when your line of work is an 18th-century Historic Trade, walk-ins are a rarity.

Yet that’s what happened last year at the Colonial Williamsburg Wheelwright and Carriage Shop. Matthew Mees and his wife were visiting the Revolutionary City and made a point to drop … Continue Reading »