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What’s New

Asters are one of the true stalwarts of the autumn garden.

White Wood Aster

Generally known as Starworts to colonial botanists and plant collector’s there are now 36 species and several varieties of this versatile genus recognized in the state of Virginia.

Large-flowered Aster

From the colonial period to relatively recently the entire genus was …

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The AMC American Revolution drama, “Turn: Washington’s Spies,” is filming in the Revolutionary City on Tuesday, Oct. 14 – and you can watch!

The Historic Area will remain open to the public, but guests may find some sites closed intermittently between the late morning and late afternoon to accommodate filming.

Preparation for the shoot begins at 7 …

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By Bill Sullivan

During Williamsburg’s opening ceremony for The Wall That Heals, Colonial Williamsburg’s Fifes and Drums laid a wreath, which found its way to panel W47, where the name Talmadge H. Alphin Jr. appears. An early member of the Fife and Drum corp, Alphin was its first bass drummer.

He was also a Green Beret, killed …

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Talmadge H. Alphin Jr.: Remembering the Drummer Known as ‘T’

During Williamsburg’s opening ceremony for The Wall That Heals, Colonial Williamsburg’s Fifes and Drums laid a wreath, which found its way to panel W47, where the name Talmadge H. Alphin Jr. appears. …

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By Toni Guagenti

For 35 years each, Linda Baumgarten and Kimberly Smith Ivey have worked with the decorative and folk arts collections at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Baumgarten specializing in textiles and costumes, Ivey in textiles and historic interiors.

For at least a dozen of those years, the women knew they had enough material – literally …

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Guest posting by Jenna Simpson

The Tucker house in Williamsburg, first home of the organized piano.

I began trying to solve the mystery of the organ’s early years by looking at the families involved: the Tuckers of Williamsburg, the Carters of Shirley and the Walkers of Castle Hill, all of whom appear to have owned …

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