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Posts Tagged ‘native americans’

in Multimedia

June 4, 2012

New Video: Colonial Williamsburg’s American Indian Initiative

A long-forgotten story returns to the streets of Colonial Williamsburg. Learn more about Virginia’s native presence and Colonial Williamsburg’s native programs in June’s vodcast.

Watch now.

in Podcasts

March 20, 2012

Adopted by the Shawnee

Runaway slave Elizabeth found freedom, family, and equality when she was adopted into the Shawnee tribe. After ten years, she returned to slavery. Hope Smith shares the heartbreaking story behind this selfless act.

Listen now.

in Podcasts, What's New

January 24, 2011

New podcast: Where Pocahontas Pledged her Love

Ongoing excavations at James Fort reveal a surprising discovery: the site of the 1608 church where Pocahontas married John Rolfe. Chief Archaeologist Bill Kelso shares the excitement of rediscovery.

Listen to the interview.

in What's New

September 30, 2010

Captain Tom Step: Nottoway Indian diplomat

Learn the remarkable story of Captain Tom Step, a Nottoway Indian who made a career as an emissary between the world he knew and the one the white man was creating in his native home.

Read the new bio.

in Visit & Events

September 23, 2010

Meet a Cherokee delegation in Williamsburg this weekend

Members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee re-enact an 18th-century “state visit” to the colonial capital as a tribal delegation portrays a Native American presence from the time period Saturday – Sunday, Sept. 25-26 for modern guests of Colonial Williamsburg’s Historic Area.

Guests may visit the Magazine yard “at the Camp of …

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in Colonial Williamsburg journal, What's New

July 7, 2010

Read “The Indian War,” from the CW Journal

“What we didn’t learn was the fact that the American colonists that came here from the beginning were invading Indian soils and driving the Indians out of their land and committing massacres. The story that is not told in most American textbooks is the deceptions that were played on the Indians, the treaties that …

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