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The Ancient Gardener's Instructor: Dispatches from Wesley Greene

March 5, 2014

From the Garden: Of dogwoods
and hellebore

From the Garden: Of dogwoods <br/>and hellebore

The Cornelian Cherry (Cornus, mas) has come to bloom in the last week which is extraordinarily late, for its normal bloom time commences in late January. It is an English cousin to the American Dogwood (Cornus florida) and it is from this plant that our native dogwood gets its name.  The common name of dogwood …

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February 26, 2014

Of peas and daffodils

Of peas and daffodils

On Thursday last the ground was finally dry enough to rake out the rows and plant the peas. This excellent esculent is judged by many to be the greatest luxury of the spring garden but they must be planted early so that they grow and ripen in a cool season. Peas which are sown too …

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February 19, 2014

From the Garden: Locust poles and a new apprentice

From the Garden: Locust poles and a new apprentice

The hotbed has proved a disappointment, generating but a paltry heat but even with this inconvenience all of the lettuce seedlings have sprouted as well as several varieties of cabbages and the cauliflower so it seems the spring crop has yet persevered.   In the cold frame we have begun to tie the last of …

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February 12, 2014

From the Garden: A new planting and a fond farewell

From the Garden: A new planting and a fond farewell

Strawing the lettuce frame

We have sown the seeds in the hotbed for the spring transplants composed of six varieties of cabbage, cauliflower, turnip cabbage (called kohlrabi by the Germans), five kinds of lettuce, leek and artichoke. All will be transplanted to the garden in early April. We have also sown a row of peas …

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February 5, 2014

From the Garden: Loading the hotbed

From the Garden: Loading the hotbed

We are somewhat behind our time, this winter being so extremely cold and snowy, but we have at last loaded the hotbed for the production of vegetable transplants.

Loading hot dung into pit

As we have already discussed, manure and straw were thrown into a great pile to heat.  It was turned once to thoroughly …

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January 30, 2014

From the Garden: Of hotbeds and hazelnuts

From the Garden: Of hotbeds and hazelnuts

Ornamentals stored in hotbed pit

We are now in the second week of extraordinarily cold weather and if it were not for the snow I fear the consequences in the garden would be much more severe.

Snow is a superb insulator and keeps the frost from striking so far into the earth. It is also …

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