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The Ancient Gardener's Instructor: Dispatches from Wesley Greene

Visit the Gardens

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There’s no substitute for seeing the real thing. Plan your visit to Williamsburg, Virginia and explore the gardens of Colonial Williamsburg’s Historic Area.

Annual Events

The annual Colonial Williamsburg Garden Symposium (late April/early May) offers a perfect opportunity for interested gardeners to explore a topic in depth. Schedules and other information are available at www.history.org/conted.

Consider visiting during Historic Garden Week in Virginia (late April). The local Garden Club showcases a variety of Williamsburg gardens and area plantations—some generally not open to the public—offer special programs. For an overview of the statewide offerings visit www.vagardenweek.org.

Garden Programs and Tours

HollyhocksGarden History Walk explains how Colonial Williamsburg landscape architects and gardeners re-create the gardens in the Historic Area using archaeological and historical documentation. Discover the evolution of the design and interpretation of our gardens and learn what influences the development and design of the landscape and gardens. Find out how we identify and use native and imported plants.

Gardens of Gentility explores how gardens reflected the lifestyles and ideals of people living in 18th-century Williamsburg. What influenced Williamsburg’s gardens prior to 1750? How did gardens signify wealth and status? How did horticulture develop between 1750 and 1800?

Meet the Gardener How does someone maintain and preserve a historic garden? Talk to a landscape volunteer and find out what goes on in the George Reid Garden. It’s a perfect opportunity to get answers to your gardening questions.

From mid-March through the Christmas season, guests can explore the Colonial Garden and Nursery, an interpretive and sales site across from Bruton Parish Church. Here garden historians use 18th-century gardening techniques and reproduction tools to interpret colonial gardening.



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